London financial district dubbed the 'new Manhattan'

Canary Wharf has also been a place of interest. The rapid redevelopment in the 1990's saw what was practically a wasteland become an international hub of business and finance.




Being one of the more prominent areas of East London, Canary Wharf boasts several high rise skyscrapers that homes several powerful companies and banks such as JP Morgan and KPMG. The iconic landmarks stretch across a small area of man-made land that is mostly surrounded by the Thames and what once was docking stations for boats.

Renting in Canary Wharf is at a considerably lower cost compared to other parts of London. With the standard renting price for a 2 bed apartment being around 1.8k/2k per month compared to 2.4K-4K in Westminster is no wonder so many young professionals are looking to move towards the modern hub.


The area is modernity at its finest. Which is probably why many have fled to Canary Wharf to live in those previously mentioned high-rises, but have begun to show their disdain for upcoming projects.


Over the next few years, a proposed 95 skyscrapers are set to be built in the area, turning Canary Wharf into a brand new metropolis within the boarder of London. The area has always had a distinct difference to the rest of London. Residents of the area have stated that the proposed plans will turn the area into a new Manhattan minus several perks such as Central Park, the Statue of Liberty and Broadway. Canary Wharf does not really offer that much in terms of leisure. With one main green space in the centre of the area, residents are often greeted by what can only be described as a concrete jungle.


Whilst the City of London is home to various skyscrapers in the baking district, the borough of Westminster contains those iconic landmarks such as the London Eye, Big Ben and Buckingham Palace.


Canary Wharf does not necessarily have a landmark. It is practically brand new - meaning that these proposed buildings and expansion could be the moment that the area separates itself from London completely. It certainly could be large enough to become a city in its own right.